Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Original Article

Identification of anger and self-esteem in psoriasis patients in a consultationliaison psychiatry setting: a case control study

1.

Department of Dermatology, Kasimpasa Military Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

2.

Department of Dermatology, Dr. Siyami Ersek Thorax and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

3.

Department of Psychiatry, Gulhane Military Medical Faculty, Ankara, Turkey

4.

Department of Dermatology, Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

5.

Department of Dermatology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

6.

Department of Psychiatry, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Istanbul-Turkey

Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology 2017; 27: 216-220
DOI: 10.1080/24750573.2017.1326740
Read: 887 Downloads: 504 Published: 10 February 2021

Objective: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic skin diseases, which has a negative impact on the interpersonal relationship and psychosocial well-being. Therefore, psoriasis may lead to a decrease in the self-esteem of the patients. Increased level of anger often accompanies patients with psoriasis. Our aim is to investigate the relationship of anger, anger expression style and level of self-esteem in patients with psoriasis and to determine whether duration and severity of disease affects anger, anger expression style and level of self-esteem. In addition, we aimed to compare the level of self-esteem in patients with early and late onset of psoriasis.

Methods: Eighty-five patients with psoriasis and 86 healthy controls were included in the study. Severity of disease was calculated with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). The patients were classified as early-onset (age < 20 years) and late-onset psoriasis (age ≥ 20 years). Duration of disease and socio-demographic characteristics were recorded. State-Trait Expression Inventory for Anger (STAXI) and Roserberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES) were used for determining anger, anger expression style and self-esteem.

Results: Trait anger, state anger and anger-in scores were statistically significantly higher in patients with psoriasis (p < .05). Anger-out and anger-control scores were similar in both groups. RSES scores were statistically significantly higher in the psoriasis group (p < .05). There was a negative weak statistically significant correlation between RSES and angercontrol scores (r = −0.246, p = .027). A positive, weak, statistically significant correlation was found between RSES scores and anger-out scores (r = 0.224, p = .045). A positive, mild, statistically significant correlation between duration of the disease and anger-in scores (r = 0.277, p = .027) was detected in patients with psoriasis whereas no statistically significant correlation between the other parameters and duration and severity of the disease was detected. No significant difference was detected when patients with early- and late-onset psoriasis were compared in terms of self-esteem (p = .722). A positive, mild, statistically significant correlation between duration of the disease and anger-in scores (r = 0.277, p = .027) was detected in patients with psoriasis whereas no statistically significant correlation between the other parameters and duration and severity of the disease was detected.

Conclusion: Reduced self-esteem and increased anger levels are remarkable in psoriasis patients. While evaluating and arranging treatment of psoriasis patients, it should be considered that psoriasis is not only a dermatological disease, but also a disease resulting in reduced self-esteem and increased anger level; therefore dermatologic and psychiatric approaches should be taken with the patients.

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EISSN 2475-0581