Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Original Article

Comparison of Attitude and Insight Toward Illness Between in Patients with Bipolar I Disorder Manic Episode and Major Depressive Disorder

1.

Department of Medical Education, Changhua Christian Hospital, Division of General Practice (PGY), Changhua, Taiwan, Republic of China

Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology 2023; 33: 292-298
DOI: 10.5152/pcp.2023.23668
Read: 743 Downloads: 348 Published: 13 October 2023

Background: Studies comparing insight toward illness in patients with bipolar I disorder manic episode and in patients with major depressive disorder are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes and insight of patients with bipolar I disorder in manic episode and in patients with major depressive disorder.

Methods: In total, 86 patients were recruited, including 52 inpatients with bipolar I disorder in manic episodes and 34 inpatients with major depressive disorder. Attitudes toward illness were evaluated using the Self-Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire. Higher Self-Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire scores indicate better awareness and positive attitudes toward one’s illness. Insights were assessed using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders. Higher scores indicate poorer insight. To identify group differences, we used Mann–Whitney U test for statistical analysis.

Results: In the Self-Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire, items 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 15, and 17 showed significantly lower scores in patients with bipolar I disorder than those with major depressive disorder (P < .05). All 3 subscales (presence/outcome of illness, need for treatment, and worry) of the SelfAppraisal of Illness Questionnaire revealed significantly lower scores in the bipolar I disorder group (P < .05). In the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders, items 3, 4, 12, and 16 showed significantly higher scores in the bipolar I disorder group (P < .05).

Conclusion: Patients with major depressive disorder had significantly more positive attitudes and greater insight than those with bipolar I disorder. Patients with bipolar I disorder are less aware of their symptoms, including changes in mood, speed of mental functioning, and social relationships. The clinicians may integrate the findings into treatment plans for mood disorders.

Cite this article as: Chang MJ, Huang SS. Comparison of attitude and insight toward illness between patients with bipolar I disorder and major depressive disorder. Psychiatry Clin Psychopharmacol. 2023;33(4):292-298.

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